Wharf Talks

JUNE 27th         ROME: FOUNDATION TO EMPIRE

 

                        By Bryan Short

 

This talk gives some insight into the way Rome evolved from an insignificant agricultural community, to the greatest power on earth. It illuminates the social and moral imperatives and catalytic events that stimulated this transition, leading to the dominance of a single person over the ‘civilised’ world, the brilliant Octavian or Augustus Caesar

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JULY 4th            LAVENDER: THE FORGOTTEN HERB. 

By Barry Hamblyn

The history of lavender in this country, how it is grown and the different varieties, its properties and uses. Barry’s wife has a lavender business which they manage together.

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JULY 11th          HART OF PLYMOUTH

By Derek Frood

Hart of Plymouth is a hidden story of Plymouth born Solomon Hart who became the first Jewish member of the Royal Academy and a 14foot square painting that he had bequeathed to Plymouth which has not been shown for a hundred years.

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JULY 18th          BEYOND BLUE PLANET

                        By Jackie Young

Takes a look at inspiration behind the plastic free campaign and impact it has had. Gives some idea of why plastics have become such a problem, where hidden threats lie and the impact it is having as well as some of the successes.

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JULY 25th          TUTANKHAMUN – TOMB AND TREASURES

By Jan Diamond

MARKING THE CENTENARY OF THE FIND:There has never been a discovery like it – not before, nor since: Howard Carter’s world-famous discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb uncovered a magnificent, astonishing, treasure trove of more than 5000 artefacts opened on 26th November 1922. This find is probably the most important in the history of Egyptology, if not the world.

During this talk, Jan endeavours to explain the puzzle of the burial, and touch on some of its treasures and the chaos Carter was presented with on the opening of this most famous archaeological find in the history of the world; and what is for her – the incredible details and logistics of his burial.

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AUGUST 8th           WATER WONDERS

  By Richard Thomas

A tour of some of the engineering marvels around the waterways system.  We visit Foxton Inclined Plane, Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, Harecastle Tunnel, Anderton Lift, Bingley Five Rise Locks and the Falkirk Wheel among others perhaps not quite so well known.

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AUG 15th          THE PAINTINGS OF THE WIDGERY FAMILY

By Chris Burchell

An illustrated talk about two painters whose works celebrate the wildness and beauty of Dartmoor. An inspired Victorian amateur, William sold almost anything he painted.

His son Frederick was also inspired by his father that he took formal training, basing his paintings on Devon and Cornwall’s moors and coasts, again selling profusely. Their works are very sought after.

Chris illustrates his talk with slides of their work, making stylistic comparisons between father and son sand the fine art of the period.

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SEPT 5th           THE HISTORY OF COINAGE

 

                        By Bryan Short

 

One of the great inventions of the Ancient Greeks, coins have been in use for over 2,500 years and adopted in every part of the world. This talk spans that entire history, highlighting important events and changes that had major effects on society. Warning: this includes some gory accounts of crime and punishment.

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SEPT 26th         THE ENGLISH RIVIERA UNESCO GLOBAL GEOPACK

 

                        By Malcolm Hart

 

The area covers 3 towns – Torquay, Paignton and Brixham and consists of marine Devonian strata with Middle Devonia characterized by coral-rich, fossiliferous limestones. Within the territory of the Geopark there are a range of “fossil” climate signals such as raised beaches, submerged forests, terrestrial cave deposits as well as fauna and hominin remains.

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OCT 3rd            DAFFODILS AND DOCK DUNG

                        By Jackie Young

A look at the History of Tamar Valley and the close links with sustainable production over time. From plight of the Devon Dock Dung Diggers to the deadly social impact of arsenic mining, the valley provides an inspirational backdrop to what has become modern living.

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OCT 10th          SEAHORSES

                        By Douglas Herdson

A fish, but one unlike any other animal. Find out more about their strange lives and why they are endangered.

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OCT 31st          REMEMBER, REMEMBER

                                    By Barry Hamblin

The story of the Gunpowder Plot. There is far more to it than Guy Fawkes and a few barrels of gunpowder! The talk explores why it happened, what happened, who really made it happen and what made Barry research this even in history.

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NOVEMBER 14th THE PRINCETOWN RAILWAY

                                    By Chris Burchell

Although not a victim of Beeching closures of 1963, the Princetown railway was closed in 1956 by British Rail as unviable. Now a popular cycling and hiking track, many would love to see the line open once again to encourage tourism. Chris’ slide talk explores the fascinating history of the branch line’s development from a quarrying track to passengers and freight for the Army and the Prison to its demise.